How to apply mascara

Oh, how I love mascara!  You can get away without it, especially with freshly tinted lashes and a good quality lash curler, but honestly, why would you want to?  Nothing says rock chick or glamour diva or gorgeous girl as much as lashings of mascara does!

I had an afternoon to myself the other week (the joys of working part time and having a school aged child!), and found myself having a play at the Napoleon Perdis counter.  I was talking to the girlies about their products and how much I love the comb-brush on their Mesmer-Eyes Mascara.  The wand doesn’t have a brush – it has a flat comb with differently-spaced teeth on each side.  They were very surprised as apparently no one likes it.  It’s not the usual mascara wand and it’s not easy to use the first time, but I highly recommend it.  It’s all in the technique.  As I was describing how I apply it, I realised that I have my own Kimba Likes Lexicon for mascara application too!

 

how to apply mascara

How to Apply Mascara

  • Firstly, curl your lashes.  I adore my Shu Uemura lash curler, and my Tweezerman one is very good too.  You really do get what you pay for with a lash curler.  You can buy replacement pads too.  I apply as close to the base of the lashes as I can comfortably get, then clamp for about 10 seconds.  The difference this makes to your lashes is amazing!  Sometimes I move it slightly away from the base and clamp again.  I don’t bother heat blasting the curler with my hairdryer first, as applying the mascara straight away gives enough of a lasting effect.  I’m also too klutzy and don’t want to singe my eyelids!
  • Next step is applying the first coat of mascara using the Wiggle technique.  Take your mascara wand, without pumping it in and out of the tube (so naughty!), and apply to the base of your lashes upwards, in a wiggly side-to-side motion.  This will deposit mascara at the base of the lashes to give the illusion of thicker lashes.
  • Then I use the Fan technique as my next step in the mascara process.  Load the wand again by replacing and removing from the tube, wiping any clumpy excess off with a tissue if you wish, and then hold the brush at the base of your lashes.  Keep the brush still and let your lashes do the work by gently lowering them onto and over the brush.  This will fan your lashes, giving the illusion of longer lashes.
  • Load the mascara wand again for the Sideways Sweep technique and then apply the mascara wand across your lashes on an angle, holding the brush almost vertically, concentrating on the outer corners.  This will give a lovely fluttery flirty look to your lashes.
  • Finally, I gently hold a mascara brush wand against my lower lashes for the Lower Lash Dash technique, without reloading it with mascara.  I find this gives me enough colour on my lower lashes, yet doesn’t create the spidery shadowy effect you can often get from putting mascara on your lower lashes.

Sometimes when I’m being very fancy pants, I use both a lengthening mascara and a volumising mascara, but I prefer a long fluttery lash over a thick lash.  I always, always choose black mascara.

I find I don’t often get mascara fallout, as I wipe the excess off my brush as I go.  The Fan technique also reduces mucky bits of mascara falling onto my face or eyelids.  I have quite long lashes too, so this may be another reason.  However, I read of an excellent technique of holding a business card or a tablespoon over your eyelids as you apply your mascara to prevent fallout.  You might like to try this!

I’d love to hear how you apply your mascara and what your favourite mascara is.  Are you a rock chick chunky lash girl, or do you prefer a lady-who-lunches fluttery lash?  Do you worship at the altar of Maybelline Great Lash or do you join me in the sceptics camp?

Kimba Likes // a style blog with a fun family twist! @kimbalikes

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